Oncotype

August 30th, 2016

Invasive Oncotype

Onocotype - Breast Cancer Texas

Have you recently been diagnosed with early-stage invasive breast cancer? Are you struggling to make treatment decisions? If so, you may be interested to know that not all women with early-stage breast cancer benefit from chemotherapy. Oncotype DX test helps identify which women with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) invasive breast cancer are more likely to benefit from adding chemotherapy to their hormonal treatment.

 

Planning Your Treatment

After a breast cancer diagnosis, doctors and patients work together to plan an appropriate course of treatment. The first step is usually surgery to remove the tumor. Following surgery, the next step is to determine how likely your cancer is to return, which may help you and your doctor make decisions about future treatment options, and whether or not to include chemotherapy.
 

Make the Right Treatment Decision—for You

It is overwhelming to receive a diagnosis of breast cancer. It is important to gather as much information as possible to determine a treatment plan that is right for you. Your doctor may consider many factors in planning your treatment, including:

  • Your age and medical history
  • The size and grade of your tumor
  • Whether your tumor has spread
  • Whether there are estrogen receptors and HER2 receptors on the cells of your tumor
  • Your treatment preferences
  • The results of your Oncotype DX test

Because every patient’s breast cancer is unique, understanding the tumor biology will help you and your doctor personalize your treatment plan.
 

What Is the Oncotype DX Test?

The Oncotype DX test is a unique diagnostic test that measures a group of cancer-related genes in your breast tumor tissue. The test gives you a Recurrence Score® result, which provides information regarding:

  • The chances of your breast cancer returning
  • The likelihood that chemotherapy will or will not help you

 

Why Should I Consider this Test?

This test provides information specific to your tumor, not available from traditional factors. Since the test provides individualized information, it enables the treatment plan to be tailored specifically for you. Speak with your healthcare team to understand how the Oncotype DX result may impact your treatment planning.
 

Is the Test Right for Me?

You may be a candidate for the Oncotype DX test if you are newly diagnosed with early stage-invasive breast cancer that is both:

  • Hormone (estrogen or progesterone) receptor-positive (ER+ or PR+)
  • HER2-negative

 

How Is the Oncotype DX Test Performed?

The test is performed on a small amount of your tumor tissue that was removed during your original surgery (lumpectomy, mastectomy, or core biopsy). This tissue is routinely saved and stored at the hospital where you had your surgery.

You will NOT have to go through any additional surgery or procedure to get the Oncotype DX test.
 

When Should the Test Be Done?

It is important that your doctor request the Oncotype DX test before you start any treatment, since the test is intended to help determine how likely your cancer is to return, which may guide treatment decisions. Surgery to remove tumor Doctor orders the Oncotype DX test Doctor receives the Recurrence Score result Hospital sends sample of tumor to the Genomic Health laboratory The Genomic Health laboratory analyzes the tumor genes Doctor and patient discuss the results and personalize treatment.
 

How Do I Get the Oncotype DX Test?

The test can only be ordered by a licensed healthcare professional, such as your doctor. You may wish to talk with your healthcare team and ask if the Oncotype DX test may be of benefit to you.
 

How Long Will It Take to Get the Results?

Most results from the Oncotype DX test are available within 7 to 14 days from the date the tumor sample is received by the Genomic Health® laboratory. The results are sent to your doctor so that he or she can discuss the results with you and answer your questions.
 

Is the Test Covered by Insurance?

The Oncotype DX test is covered by Medicare and by most private insurance companies.
In addition, Genomic Health offers the Genomic Access Program (GAP), a comprehensive program designed to help you with the coverage process and provide financial assistance when necessary, based on eligibility. Please call (866) ONCOTYPE (866-662-6897) for more information on insurance and for financial-aid questions.
 

Understanding Your Recurrence Score Result

Your doctor will receive a report with the results of your Oncotype DX test that contains your Recurrence Score result:

It is important to understand that a lower Recurrence Score result does not mean that there is no chance that your breast cancer will return. Also, a higher Recurrence Score result does not mean that your breast cancer will definitely return.

The results also provide additional information, such as the activity levels of the estrogen and progesterone receptors in your tumor, which may also help guide your treatment.

DISTRIBUTION OF RECURRENCE SCORE RESULTS (0-100)

A lower Recurrence Score result means:

  • Your cancer is less likely to come back in 10 years
  • Chemotherapy is less likely to benefit you

A higher Recurrence Score result means:

  • Your cancer is more likely to come back in 10 years
  • Chemotherapy is more likely to benefit you

 

Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS)

Have you recently been diagnosed with a non-invasive form of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)? Are you struggling to understand what your treatment options are?

DCIS is a commonly diagnosed breast condition and rarely life-threatening. It is considered to be an early, non-invasive form of breast cancer.

  • Ductal carcinoma means the tumor is within the milk ducts
  • In situ means it is in its original place and has not spread beyond the ducts

It is overwhelming to get the diagnosis, but DCIS is treatable. After therapy, some women with DCIS are still at risk for the cancer coming back in the same breast (local recurrence) as either DCIS or invasive breast cancer.
 

Planning Your Treatment

After a diagnosis of DCIS, the first step is usually surgery to remove the DCIS tumor. Following surgery, the next step is to determine how likely your cancer is to return, which may help you and your doctor make decisions about future treatment options.
 

Make the Right Treatment Decision—for You

There are several treatments for DCIS after surgery, so it is important to gather as much information as possible to decide on a treatment plan that is right for you. Your doctor may consider many factors in planning your treatment, including:

  • Your medical history
  • Your age
  • Size, grade and surgical margin width of your DCIS tumor
  • Whether your tumor cells have estrogen receptors
  • The results of your Oncotype DX test
  • Your treatment preferences

Because every woman’s DCIS is unique, understanding the tumor biology will help you and your doctor personalize your treatment plan.
 

How Is the Oncotype DX Test Performed?

The test is performed on a small amount of your DCIS tumor tissue that was removed during your original surgery (lumpectomy, or core biopsy). This tissue is routinely saved and stored at the hospital where you had your surgery.

You will NOT have to go through any additional surgery or procedure to get the Oncotype DX test.
 

When Should the Test Be Done?

It is important that your doctor request the Oncotype DX test before you start any treatment, since the test is intended to help determine how likely your cancer is to return, which may guide treatment decisions. Surgery to remove tumor Doctor orders the Oncotype DX test Doctor receives the DCIS Score result Hospital sends sample of tumor to the Genomic Health laboratory The Genomic Health laboratory analyzes the tumor genes Doctor and patient discuss the results and personalize treatment
 

What Is the Oncotype DX Test?

The Oncotype DX Breast DCIS Score is a unique diagnostic test that measures a group of cancer-related genes in your DCIS tumor. The test gives you a DCIS Score result, which provides you information regarding the chance that the cancer may come back in the same breast.
 

Why Should I Consider this Test?

This test provides information specific to your tumor, not available from traditional factors. Since the test provides individualized information, it enables the treatment plan to be tailored specifically for you. It gives you and your doctor a better understanding of how your DCIS tumor behaves. Speak with your healthcare team to understand how the Oncotype DX test results may impact your treatment planning.
 

Is the Test Right for Me?

You may be a candidate for the test if you meet both of these criteria:

  • You have been recently diagnosed with DCIS and are making treatment decisions with your doctor
  • You have had a lumpectomy or biopsy

 

How Do I Get the Oncotype DX Test?

The test can only be ordered by a licensed healthcare professional, such as your doctor. You may wish to talk with your healthcare team and ask if the test may be of benefit to you.
 

How Long Will It Take to Get the Results?

Most results from the Oncotype DX test are available within 7 to 14 days from the date the tumor sample is received by the Genomic Health® laboratory. The results are sent to your doctor so that he or she can discuss the results with you and answer your questions.
 

Is the Test Covered by Insurance?

The Oncotype DX test is covered by Medicare and private insurance coverage varies.

In addition, Genomic Health offers the Genomic Access Program (GAP), a comprehensive program designed to help you with the coverage process and provide financial assistance when necessary, based on eligibility. Please call (866) ONCOTYPE (866-662-6897) for more information on insurance and for financial-aid questions.
 

Understanding Your DCIS Score Result

Your doctor will receive a report with the results of your Oncotype DX test that contains your DCIS Score result.

It is important to understand that a lower DCIS Score result does not mean that there is no chance that your breast cancer will return. Also, a higher DCIS Score result does not mean that your breast cancer will definitely return.

The results also provide additional information, such as the activity levels of hormone receptors in your tumor, which may also help guide your treatment.
 

DISTRIBUTION OF DCIS SCORE RESULTS (0-100)

A lower DCIS Score result means:

  • Your cancer is less likely to come back in 10 years

A higher DCIS Score result means:

  • Your cancer is more likely to come back in 10 years

Used with permission from Genomic Health